WELCOME TO THE NEW WEBSITE

The use of therapeutic regimes that rely on polypharmacy entail higher risks of drug interactions. Consequently, these interactions must be monitored more closely by health professionals. InterMED-Rx provides health professionals with a user-friendly tool at the cutting edge of scientific knowledge. This site provides a better grasp of drug interactions related to the cytochrome P450 superfamily.

InterMED-Rx and the Cytochrome P450

Leading you into the future of pharmacokinetics and pharmacogenomics.

Cytochrome P450 Theoretical Notions

The cytochrome P450 is a superfamily of enzymes whose main role is to transform liposoluble substances into more hydrosoluble substances. This action typically favours the elimination of substances perceived as potentially toxic. It is important to note that the 57 cytochrome P450 isoenzymes found in human beings contribute both to the biotransformation of exogenous and endogenous substances and to the synthesis of endogenous compounds.

In this section of our site, health professionals have access to theoretical notions about the underlying principles of metabolism, the cytochrome P450 superfamily and the particular characteristics of certain isoenzymes.

Cytochrome P450 Table

This section of our site provides an original and unique listing of the inhibitors, substrates and inducers of the cytochromes P450 major isoenzymes. The presentation of substrates in three affinity categories makes it possible to predict which one will lead to a modification of the elimination capacities of another substrate. The selection of a given substrate calls up a list of pre-selected references that provide users with scientific data relevant to their decision.

Access to this section of our site is restricted to members only. If you would like to become a member click the SIGN UP button at the top of the page.
 

Long QT Syndrome Analysis

While medications are a critical intervention for the prevention and treatment of disease, disability and death, they also can cause problems on a broad scale. One particular side-effect that could be associated with certain drugs is a perturbation of the heart’s capability to regain its resting membrane potential after a heartbeat. Such a condition is associated with a prolongation of the QT interval on the surface electrocardiogram (ECG) and is generally described as the drug-induced Long QT Syndrome (LQTS). Prolongation of the QT interval may predispose patients to syncopal events and a particular polymorphic ventricular tachycardia described as Torsade de Pointes (TdP), which may lead to sudden death. We review in this section basic electrophysiological mechanisms behind drug-induced LQTS as well as proposed mechanisms for mitigating this risk.

Our group has created an inclusive model to account for additional factors that may influence a medication’s likelihood of causing drug-induced LQTS or TdP, called the Long QT-JT index. We have also developed a more advanced and comprehensive patient-specific tool, called the Long QT-JT Score, which is dynamic based on the patient’s current conditions and concomitant medications.

About genotyping...

Vis accumsan feugiat adipiscing nisl amet adipiscing accumsan blandit accumsan sapien blandit ac amet faucibus aliquet placerat commodo. Interdum ante aliquet commodo accumsan vis phasellus adipiscing. Ornare a in lacinia.


Web Service Integration

Your pharmacy management application, our drug interaction analysis results, through web service integration. It can be as simple as query and display or you can personlize the responses before rendering. We will guide you through the process.



ACB, SB and Beers Criteria... why are they important?

Medications with anticholinergic (ACH) activity are frequently prescribed for common conditions that affect older adults, such as depression, insomnia, pain, and urinary incontinence. Providers caring for older adults tend to be well aware of the strong ACH activity of medications such as bladder antispasmodics and tricyclic antidepressants but not necessarily aware of the relatively strong ACH activity of certain antidepressants and antipsychotics. They also may not be aware of the weak ACH activity of some commonly prescribed medications for older adults, such as antihypertensives and diuretics, and providers may not realize that using multiple medications with weaker ACH activity concomitantly can have additive effects.

Similar to ACH burden, medications with sedative (SDV) activity are frequently prescribed for common conditions that affect older adults, such as insomnia and pain, and different pharmacologic classes of SDV medications have varying degrees of SDV activity. Likewise, providers caring for older adults tend to be well aware of the strong SDV activity of medications such as benzodiazepines and opioids but they may not be aware of the week SDV activity of some commonly prescribed medications for older adults, such as certain antidepressants and antipsychotics. Further, providers may not realize that using multiple medications with weaker SDV activity concomitantly can have additive effects.

Finally, the Beers’s criteria for potentially inappropriate medication use in the elderly are guidelines for healthcare providers to prescribe safer drugs in older adults. An emphasis is put on deprescribing medications that are unnecessary thus reducing problems of drug-drug interactions and adverse drug effects.